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HomeEventsSlavery in the President’s Neighborhood

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Slavery in the President’s Neighborhood

When:
Wednesday, June 1, 2022, 2:00 PM until 2:45 PM
Additional Info:
Event Contact(s):
Elizabeth Haile
Category:
BMAV Event
Registration is recommended
Payment In Full In Advance Only
No Fee
Many people think of the White House as a symbol of democracy, but it also embodies America’s complicated past and the paradoxical relationship between slavery and freedom in the nation’s capital. The White House Historical Association’s Slavery in the President’s Neighborhood initiative explores this history and shares the lives of the enslaved workers who built, lived, and worked at the White House. Join White House Historian Sarah Fling as she shares this research and highlights a few of these fascinating individuals.

Co-hosted with the Connie Morella Library. Free and open to the public. Go here for more information and the Zoom link. https://mcpl.libnet.info/event/6613391

Sarah Fling started at the White House Historical Association in 2019 as a graduate public history fellow before joining as a historian in 2021. Her research focuses on free and enslaved workers, the first ladies, and the White House Collection. Sarah’s previous work experience includes internships at historic sites such as George Washington’s Mount Vernon and the Frick Pittsburgh. She received her bachelor’s degree in History from the University of Pittsburgh and her master’s in Public History from American University.